Wet dry cloudy sunny rainy day in Sydney

Second before, the brolly was needed/


Same time, same place.

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Ill met by moonlight…

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Oh such a scandal, lez and gems! The best place for a look/perve at the latest doings in NSW is Granny Herald: Sex scandal rocks Labor; Tough tactics forged in the city of steel; Whiff of disrepute just got a whole lot worse for Keneally; Plot lost first, credibility, then interest; The days of privacy in politics are gone; Barber’s chair but no haircuts, and towel-free Friday nights.

The short version for those who can’t be bothered is that the NSW Minister for Transport, David “Walrus” Campbell, was filmed by Channel Seven leaving one of Sydney’s best known gay meeting places and destressing joints.

I’ve been to Ken’s, but only once. I am sure the visitors from home and overseas would give a most interesting cross section of society at all levels. I do know several regulars there, decent chaps every one.

Time Out characterises Ken’s thus:

Kens At Kensington – Sauna

High The steam room. Bring some V05 Hot Oil and a mud mask and give yourself a little treatment while being ‘treated’.
Low The Dark Room. There’s a reason it’s not lit like the SCG, so make like Helen Keller and feel for a pretty face before you head south.
Etiquette Always play nice. Even if a Ray Martin look-alike grabs your arse, a discrete "I’m fine, thanks" is nicer than "Bugger off!"
Happy Hour Feeling peckish around lunchtime? Kens have a $13 entry fee between 11am–3pm Monday to Friday. With spa, pool, sauna and steam room amenities, that’s the cheapest day spa with extras in town.
83 Anzac Parade, Kensington 2033. (02 9662 1359)

inline-saunaettiquette I thought I would include contact details for other TV channels who may be miffed by Channel Seven’s rather obvious inside track on these things. Just go on spec, guys and gals. You never know who you might catch coming out! Even your own boss wouldn’t be totally out of the question. 😉

That to me is the biggest scandal: how did Channel Seven come to be there? Who sent them?

Fellow Twitterers/Facebookies/Bloggers have had a say. Thomas thinks it’s such a shame; Mr Rabbit wonders if it will drive gay men into the arms of women; Matthew da Silva couldn’t give a fig about it; Adrian Phoon rightly notes “There was NO public stake in exposing this man’s sexuality.”

Or sexual behaviour, which may not be the same thing.

On that see Equating Sexual Orientation with ‘Sex Life’ by Glenn Greenwald.

Perhaps it’s naïveté, but I’ve been amazed by the outraged objections of many Good Liberals to the mere discussion of Elena Kagan’s sexual orientation.  Without realizing it, they’ve completely internalized one of the most pernicious myths long used to demand that gay people remain in the closet:  namely, that to reveal one’s sexual orientation is to divulge one’s "sex life." From the first moment that Ben Domenech wrote his now infamous CBS post mistakenly stating that Kagan is "openly gay" — something which a slew of Good Liberals at Harvard also long believed — the furious reactions have been extremely eye-opening about how many people continue to equate sexual orientation with one of those dark, sexualized topics that all polite and decent people should be willing to avoid…

Of the Herald articles my pick is Plot lost first, credibility, then interest.

DAVID CAMPBELL was as good as the government he served.

As Minister for Transport and Roads he was a solid performer and a likeable man but he began to falter in his job as the government lost the plot on transport.

He capped off a run of bad luck, or poor judgment, with his handling of the F3 debacle in April, when traffic on the freeway was gridlocked for 12 hours.

Campbell maintained he could not interfere in the ”operational details” of the RTA, just as an attorney-general or a police minister could not interfere in cases. But he failed to see the difference between inappropriate interference by a minister in a legal matter and a minister being on top of his portfolio during an unfolding crisis.

But Campbell deserves sympathy for being handed a job that had become a career killer.

For the past two years, he was forced to defend the constantly changing transport policies of constantly changing premiers. When he got the job in September 2008, the departing premier, Morris Iemma, had left plans for a metro to the north-western suburbs. At $12.5 billion, it was monstrously expensive and plagued by problems. Yet Campbell dutifully signed on as chief salesman for a pie-in-the-sky project.

When then-premier Nathan Rees announced in his November 2008 mini-budget that the metro was being scrapped, to be replaced by a $5.3 billion, seven-kilometre line between Central and Rozelle that duplicated existing public transport, Campbell turned up for duty again.

When Kristina Keneally seized the premiership last December, she set about abandoning the metro in favour of improving CityRail, and, again, Campbell was forced to argue for a new set of transport priorities.

Whatever case he made, he could never win because the government had long ago lost its credibility on transport…

No wonder the old walrus wanted destressing. Oh, and that “tax-payer funded car” angle. Ministers are allowed to use their cars for private purposes. I am sure if Campbell had driven to church in it no-one would have objected, except maybe for very scrupulous atheists.

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